Home Voices of the Industry Dolls in Black, Chronicles and Perspectives From Cookie Cutters to OOAKs—the true value of a collection
From Cookie Cutters to OOAKs—the true value of a collection
Written by Debbie Garrett   

I hand selected each of my dolls, which is why each one is dear to me; their monetary value is secondary.  Even my "cookie cutter" dolls, whose market value is relatively nil, possess sentimental value.   They began my adult collection.  Dolls with unremarkable brown faces:

I hand selected each of my dolls, which is why each one is dear to me; their monetary value is secondary.  Even my "cookie cutter" dolls, whose market value is relatively nil, possess sentimental value. They began my adult collection.  Dolls with unremarkable brown faces: (mostly manufactured, white dolls colored brown) with slight hair and accessory differences, that were usually overpriced,   whose frou-frou-to-themed fashions exceed the dolls' values, and often acquired via mail order. These are my "cookie cutters."

The eventual purchase of my first artist doll led to the acquisition of my first vintage doll.  Years later, I acquired my first antique doll, which led to the ultimate possession of my first one-of-a-kind doll.  Doll searches, finds, and genre changes have remained constant.

As doll selectivity improved with quality superseding quantity, I eventually acquired my first OOAK.  Immediately, that incited the desire to own another by a certain renowned artist.

After learning of actress Demi Moore's recently insured, two-million dollar doll collection , I briefly noted the cumulative value of my collection is meager in comparison.  Soon thereafter I realized my collection's value is far from meager.  I collect dolls that are immeasurably precious to me, whose costs remain well within my financial means.

Will my collection ever be valued two-million dollars?  This is extremely doubtful.  However, my collection remains priceless to me.

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Debbie, your post reminds me that I should get my dolls and action figures appraised and insured. But the true value of the DAFs is the esteem that I have for them. Most are nOT expensive, but many would not be replacable or easily replaced. Sigh. So that makes them priceless to me regardless of the dollar cost.
Dana Cooper , August 09, 2009 | url
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I'm certain that every millionairess-doll collector would spend some of it on dolls, too!

Thanks so much for your comment, Alison. smilies/smiley.gif
Debbie , August 06, 2009 | url
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How true! I consider monetary value is only one minor consideration in a) buying a doll and b) valuing my collection. How much I personally value each doll in my collection is what makes it priceless! (However--if I had two million dollars to spend on dolls, I would more than likely do so!) smilies/wink.gif
Alison , August 06, 2009 | url

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